Review of: Therese Raquin

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 02.12.2019
Last modified:02.12.2019

Summary:

Jetzt hat am Strand.

Therese Raquin

Emile Zola - Therese Raquin. Thérèse Raquin- Einführung. „Thérèse Raquin“ war der erste große Roman des jungen Zola. Er erschien in Feuilletons einer. Der erschienene Roman "Therese Raquin" der erste Roman von Emile Zola (), beschreibt in seinem ersten Teil eine unheilvolle, allein auf die​. Émile Zola. Émile Zola Thérèse Raquin Impressum Texte: Émile Zola Umschlag: Walter Brendel Übersetzung: Walter Brendel Front Cover.

Therese Raquin Hachette Children's Group

Thérèse Raquin ist der Name des dritten von Émile Zola verfassten Romans, der erschien. Er wird häufig als sein erster eigentlicher Roman bezeichnet. Therese Raquin oder Thérèse Raquin steht für: Thérèse Raquin, Roman von Émile Zola (); Therese Raquin () (Originaltitel Teresa Raquin). Heute steht Thérèse Raquin im Schatten des großen Romanzyklus Die Rougon-​Macquart. Dabei hat schon dieser frühe Roman alles, was den späteren Zola. Thérèse Raquin: Roman (dtv Literatur) | Tschöke, Wolfgang, Zola, Emile, Tschöke, Wolfgang | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit. Der erschienene Roman "Therese Raquin" der erste Roman von Emile Zola (), beschreibt in seinem ersten Teil eine unheilvolle, allein auf die​. Émile Zola. Émile Zola Thérèse Raquin Impressum Texte: Émile Zola Umschlag: Walter Brendel Übersetzung: Walter Brendel Front Cover. Und: Therese Raquin erschien bereits , also noch weit vor den ersten Bänden des Rougon-Maquart-Zyklus (enthalten u.a. Nana oder Germinal), mit dem.

Therese Raquin

Heute steht Thérèse Raquin im Schatten des großen Romanzyklus Die Rougon-​Macquart. Dabei hat schon dieser frühe Roman alles, was den späteren Zola. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Thérèse Raquin«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Emile Zola - Therese Raquin. Thérèse Raquin- Einführung. „Thérèse Raquin“ war der erste große Roman des jungen Zola. Er erschien in Feuilletons einer.

Therese Raquin See a Problem? Video

In Secret TRAILER 1 (2014) - Elizabeth Olsen Movie HD

Her father took his sister, a haberdasher, to raise with her son. Camille, a bright but sickly child. Zola painted a picture of dark and dull lives, and yet he held me.

When Camille tried to pull away from his protective mother life changed. A passionate, obsessive relationship grew between them.

Their feelings were tangible. They feared discovery. They knew what they wanted, and they were oblivious to anything else. And so they acted.

That act is stunning. A flash of light in a dark story, and it is executed quite brilliantly. It may sound like an end, but it came early in the story.

The knowledge of what they had done, the consequences of what they had done, were corrosive. For Laurent. And for their relationship. The pair seem trapped, in lives overtaken by guilt, horror and despair.

But then something snaps. A downward spiral leads to a devastating conclusion. Zola handles all of this magnificently.

And he deployed his cast — four principals, four supporting players, and a cat — so cleverly. Each was essential. Each had more than one role to play.

Their story has broad strokes, and it has small details too, and they all work together beautifully. The story is desperately dark, but it is honest and never gratuitous.

And the story is paramount; everything else is there to support the story, and it is woven in so well that it is never a distraction. You could stop to observe if you chose, or you could be quite naturally swept along by events.

That allowed him to bring flawed, fallible, utterly real human beings to life on the page. To lay bare their hearts and souls.

And to make the evolution of their lives, the extraordinary things that happen, completely understandable. And so it was that the skill of the author, and the understanding of the author, make this book compelling, horrific, and desperately sad.

View all 5 comments. Jun 15, Petra-masx rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Heavy literature readers with a taste for social issues.

Shelves: fiction , reviewed. The shortest and most readable books from the vol Rougon-Macquart cycle but perhaps not the best one to start with.

I was in my early teens, possibly a bit younger, and I was taken aback by the warnings on the banners for it outside a local theatre.

Whilst I can't remember the wording, I recall thinking that I didn't know plays could be like that, with so much sex and violence and certificate-ness - I thought that was only in films.

The displays also managed, somehow, to communicate that it was quite horrible: none of this made me want to read or see the thing as soon as I was old enough to get away with it, unlike the usual allure of the forbidden for a teenager.

It's too rare in English that we get to read a translator who's also a respected novelist in their own right, and Thorpe's version gave the opportunity for this experience, one that's much commoner when reading fiction translated into other languages.

Even the introduction is beautifully written, saying, for example, "Its prose rhythms push forward relentlessly through a process of phrasal accumulation, eddying only to swirl faster, with something of the swift force that we find in Greek tragedy.

There is little nuance. It is this denial of discursiveness or subplotting backwater that creates the reader's sense of entrapment, as much as the setting itself.

So this was a lovely surprise. We all revere him. It drips with graphic descriptions of putrefaction. It is claustrophobic, unnerving psychological horror, both of the thinking mind and of the characters' behaviour to one another.

There is increasing violence. People are horribly hurt and taken advantage of. Zola's empirical approach, inspired by the science of his day, adds the creepy, reductive unpleasantness of 19th-century pseudo-scientific classifications and stereotypes of race, social class and disability, which give the novel an extra layer of disgust for many 21st-century readers, one which it would not have had for its early audiences.

Likewise the public display of bodies in the Paris Morgue which wasn't yet refrigerated in the s may seem appalling now - when society's need for such a spectacle is hived off to horror films - though it clearly wasn't to many Parisians of the day.

There are no indications here about what 19th-century people from other countries thought of it. Altogether, this is not the Ken Loach type of thing I expected from Zola; nor is it just Dickens without the laughs; it is much darker and more insidious.

I'd guess that friends who read a lot of early horror are more familiar with this sort of thing. The later part of the book has a propulsive energy that distracts from that rigidity, as the characters take on a life of their own and the novel becomes engrossing.

Though I wonder how much of that keenness was my relief that it would be over soon; I had to finish the book quickly because I didn't want to come back to all this day after day and feel its dread creeping into other parts of life.

Of course it existed in penny dreadfuls, underground literature and salacious news reports, but isn't found in classic English novels.

This, along with Robin Buss' introduction to the Penguin edition of Raquin , gave me a clearer sense of what Naturalism was as distinct from realism - and of how it was a critique of Romanticism that nevertheless combined with it to produce the decadent movement later in the century.

The novel's mentions of sex are vague and coy by our standards, but certainly bolder and more scandalous than anything else I've seen in 19th century classics - and the descriptions of rotting bodies are more detailed and prolonged than in most other books I've ever read, and better written than anything similar in modern police procedurals.

It also overtly rejects religion: hellish tortures may be visited on characters in life, but the idea of reward or punishment in the next world is almost absent, and it seems that the narrative's outlook is that death is the end.

Most of my favourite bits were about the mundane, far from the gothic terror of the main plot. These details of daily routine Zola no doubt knew well in his twenties, from working as a clerk like Camille, Laurent and Grivet.

Thorpe says Raquin is a young man's book, and whilst that is perhaps because of the tempestuousness of the protagonists, I also see it in these scenes which reminded me of working life in my twenties and some of its frustrations - boredom, tiredness and the excitement of moving to a capital city which Zola also knew from returning to Paris aged Camille wanders around favourite areas of Paris on his way to and from work, from one perspective wasting time, but also drinking in the atmosphere of a place he'd longed to live in, including things which may have seemed unremarkable to those who know the city better.

He thought about nothing. Frequently he would plant himself in front of Notre-Dame and gaze at the scaffolding wrapped around the church, which was under repair; these bulky pieces of timber amused him, he had no idea why.

Then, passing by the Port aux Vins, he would glance in and count the hackney coaches coming from the station.

In the evening, dazed, head full of some silly story told in the office, he crossed the Jardin des Plantes and went to see the bears if he was not in too much of a hurry… he would scrutinise them with open lips and big round eyes, relishing with an idiot delight the sight of them moving around.

He would finally decide to go home, dragging his feet, noticing the passers-by, the carriages, the shops. This was the only thing that really made me feel a sense of connection to the author.

There's the extra expenditure of time and energy above which doesn't necessarily make sense, but which can happen through a continual low-level tiredness that leads to a lot of dawdling and blank staring.

Likewise the need to sate some inner drive by throwing oneself into certain tasks irrespective of the way that they are more tiring than for the average person, and lead to a stupefied blankness, as when Camille starts his first job: "His restless mind made idleness unbearable.

He felt calmer and healthier toiling like a brute, working as a clerk with his head bent over bills, over vast reckonings whose every digit he would patiently spell out.

In the evening, shattered, his head empty, he found the depths of his stupor unutterably sensual. And in Laurent's first bout of solitary sleeplessness, the rhythms of how he first tries to fight it, then lies there and thinks, and how and when it affects work the next day were all perfectly observed.

The sense of drudgery in domestic routine, including Mme Raquin's Thursday night gatherings to play dominoes, builds up more subtly and gradually like Impressionist paintwork, and has that same sense of deep truth in representation.

Zola writes these meetings in such a clever way that the convivial appeal and the dull narrowness are equally apparent.

Despite what Thorpe said about Zola writing as if he were painting, I was not prepared for quite how much: there are phrases that read more like a description of a Turner canvas than like scenery from other midth century novels: "the Seine, the sky, the islands, the small hills were no more than brown and grey stains being washed away in the midst of a milky fog".

And reading that he drew inspiration from Poe makes me a little apprehensive about reading a substantial collection by the American horror pioneer.

It's interesting to read that Poe has always been very popular in France, though as he was translated by Baudelaire - what a black? I can also start to understand what's meant when Virginie Despentes' Vernon Subutex , one of my favourites of the past decade, is praised as a contemporary version of Balzac or Zola; a little connection here - tenuous or not, I'm unsure - is that the Raquins start the novel living in a town named Vernon.

A GR friend who's read several of Zola's novels, and several by Balzac, also seems to see the dehumanising typology in Zola's characters which I found quite repellent.

I think it's also a demonstration of how using psychology-textbook case studies, or star signs, as writing prompts to create characters, may not turn out rounded, interesting, believable personalities.

I suspect I may, like that GR friend, prefer Balzac. Pere Goriot was also an emotionally intense read, but productively so.

Incidentally, both novels feature increasingly impoverished elderly parents who made long-term mistakes while bringing up their children, although they meant well, and which have gigantically, disproportionately awful repercussions during the course of the novels.

I'm not sure if this is a major theme in 19th century French literature or just a coincidence between these two books. Neither Balzac nor Zola has the jollity of Dickens; whilst I was way overdue on reading the two Frenchmen, it still seems easier to turn to Dickens.

View all 7 comments. Dec 28, Perry rated it liked it. Apparently, this is a novel characterized as "naturalism," due to its scientific or detached narrative.

The four temperaments are represented by Therese Raquin, an unhappily married young woman melancholic , Madame Raquin, her overbearing and selfish aunt choleric , Camille Raquin, her sickly, self-centered husband, who is also her 1st cousin phlegmatic all of whom all live together, and Laurent, interloping friend of the husband sanguine.

You might guess what happens. If so, great. If not, I don't wanna spoil all your insidious fun. Very scary, very dark and definitely wonderful.

Could not put this down. I learned about evil in this book. Shelves: fiction , pulp , crime-badness-noir.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Therese Raquin is not a very good novel. It does, however, have some very interesting parts.

For the first half of the book, all these elements mix nicely or nastily. Therese Raquin, who is part north African, is, as a child, abandone Therese Raquin is not a very good novel.

Therese Raquin, who is part north African, is, as a child, abandoned by her soldier father to live with her aunt and sickly cousin, Camille, with whom she shares a bed.

Therese herself is described as thin-lipped and sharp featured. Camille, who she more or less is forced to marry, is an idiot, and her aunt is an old fuddy duddy who moves the family from a nice country setting, to a dingy Paris alley, where she opens a haberdashery.

Paint it Black! As the family settles into its routine, a weekly ritual of dominos with friends becomes part of the mix.

And in this bare and chilly room there were enacted scenes of burning lust, sinister in their brutality. Each fresh meeting brought still more frenzied ecstasies.

Soon, in a vague sort of way, the lovers sense that Camille needs to go. At this point in the novel, the killing chapter Chapter 11 , that strikes me as crime writing at its finest.

Later, they all go out in a boat and, well, do the murder math. After that, the wheels fly off the novel is a spectacular way.

Immediately the lovers start feeling all paranoid, and wondering if they will be found out. This gets silly fast, as both Laurent and Therese find themselves jumping at shadows, as well as seeing and hearing things.

Camille calmly lay down between them, whilst Laurent wept over his impotence and Therese trembled lest the corpse might have the idea of using its victory to take her into its putrefied arms as her lawful master.

This is not a supernatural novel, and yet this, and similar scenes, go on for pages and pages. The repetition is simply jaw-dropping.

The ending is for the most part predictable, maybe even more coldly comforting than these two deserve. Zola offers up the epitaph about 50 pages before the end: Nothing existed but murder and lust.

May 28, Nicola rated it really liked it Shelves: books. Reading Zola surely sets the bar - I'd say he is the French Hardy but although they are both masters of their art and certainly like to dwell in the downer side of town, Zola deals with the city and the impact of the immediate environment and people on the psyche of the individual which isn't really an area that Hardy greatly concentrates on.

Of course I've yet to read a lot of Zola so I could be wrong but going on the fact that he seems to be acknowledged as the trailblazer of the Human Superb.

Of course I've yet to read a lot of Zola so I could be wrong but going on the fact that he seems to be acknowledged as the trailblazer of the Human Naturalist's then it's probably a safe assumption to make even so early on in my reading of his books.

Right from the outset Zola sets his stage: At the end of the Rue Guenegaud, coming from the quays, you find the Arcade of the Pont Neuf, a sort of narrow, dark corridor running from the Rue Mazarine to the Rue de Seine.

This arcade, at the most, is thirty paces long by two in breadth. It is paved with worn, loose, yellowish tiles which are never free from acrid damp.

The square panes of glass forming the roof, are black with filth. It's this dirty little patch of Paris where even as readers we feel choked and claustrophobic, where lives are played out.

The main character, Therese, is unable to free herself from the chains which bind her to her aunt and her cousin and takes a lover in the dishonest 'friend' of her husband as a form of emotional expression more than anything else.

This is a dark novel but it's also eminently readable. Everyone in our book group liked it and found it difficult to put down some read it all in one go!

For anybody wanting a taste of Zola but who feels a little intimidated by the Les Rougon-Macquart series, this is a great place to start.

View 2 comments. Jul 03, Khashayar Mohammadi rated it really liked it Shelves: classics , french-lit. Its a claustrophobic tale of murder and adultery that sets the scene for many modern French Romance novels to come.

Taking the simplicity of the plot into consideration, I was pleasantly surprised by how engrossing the narrative was.

Zola's preface to the second edition of this novel, which is included in the audiobook version I listened to, confirms that the work caused quite a sensation when it was first published in In the preface, Zola defends himself against charges of obscenity and states that the novel is in effect a detached and scientific study of the effect of temperament.

While I'm not sure just how scientific and detached Zola really was, he was certainly scientific and detached enough for the novel to be r Zola's preface to the second edition of this novel, which is included in the audiobook version I listened to, confirms that the work caused quite a sensation when it was first published in While I'm not sure just how scientific and detached Zola really was, he was certainly scientific and detached enough for the novel to be regarded as an early example of naturalism.

It's a great read, but only if you're interested both in psychology and in reading about deeply unpleasant people making very poor life choices. It features an unhappy marriage, adultery, murder, guilt and paranoia: all the fun stuff.

But the prose is wonderful, the atmosphere Zola creates is dark and claustrophobic and the ending is full of suspense.

I listened to a French language audiobook, available for free from this website. There's another free French language audiobook out there this one. Avoid it at all costs.

I listened to the first chapter and the narrator is simply awful. Shelves: rth-lifetime , reading-through-history , Therese Raquin is Madame Bovary on steroids.

The young Zola was impressed by Bovary, and its influence is clear throughout Raquin - but he ratchets every aspect of the story up, for better and Mainly that's because Zola is no match at all for Flaubert psychologically.

Bovary is as trenchant a view inside the human brain as I've read outside Tolstoy; laser-focused and brilliant.

Zola, by contrast, is muddling about with some almost Medieval n Therese Raquin is Madame Bovary on steroids. Zola, by contrast, is muddling about with some almost Medieval notions of sanguine that means optimistic vs.

It's all a mess, and unfortunately Zola hammers the shit out of it, and it all feels sophomoric. On the other hand, once you get past the psychological mumbo-jumbo, it's a fiercely intense book - straining at its sleeves with dread and tension.

You thought Bovary had some unlikable characters? Rate This. Episode Guide. Added to Watchlist. Completed: Television.

Mini-series Watchlist. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Episodes Seasons.

Photos Add Image. Edit Cast Series cast summary: Kate Nelligan Madame Raquin 3 episodes, Brian Cox Laurent LeClaire 3 episodes, Richard Pearson Michaud 3 episodes, Timothy Bateson Grivet 3 episodes, Philip Bowen Olivier Michaud 3 episodes, Jenny Galloway Suzanne Michaud 3 episodes, Alan Rickman Vidal 3 episodes, Kenneth Cranham Edit Storyline Based on the novel by Emile Zola, Therese Raquin is a tale of passion, obsession, and the psychological aftermath of an unforgivable deed.

Genres: Drama. Certificate: Not Rated. Edit Did You Know? User Reviews Watch out: in these adulterous times, you might still be shocked!!! Was this review helpful to you?

Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Edit Details Country: UK. Language: English. Runtime: min. Sound Mix: Mono. It soon becomes a torrid love affair.

After some time, Laurent's boss no longer allows him to leave early, so the lovers must think of something new.

It seems Camille is the only obstacle in this. They eventually drown him during a boat trip, though in defending himself Camille succeeds in biting Laurent on the neck.

Madame Raquin is in shock after hearing of her son's disappearance. Everybody believes that the drowning was an accident and that the couple actually tried to save Camille.

Laurent is still uncertain about whether Camille is truly dead and frequently visits the mortuary, which he persists in although it disturbs him, until he finally finds the dead body there.

Their feelings toward each other are greatly changing, but they still plot to marry without raising suspicion and therefore reap the rewards of their actions.

They finally marry but they're haunted by the memory of the murder; Laurent's bite scar serves as a constant reminder for them both.

They have hallucinations of the dead Camille in their bed every night, preventing them from touching each other and quickly driving them even more insane.

They vacillate between trying desperately to rekindle their passion to get rid of the corpse hallucinations and trying to 'heal' the bite scar , and despising each other.

Laurent, previously an untalented artist, is suddenly struck with surprising talent and skill, but he can no longer paint a picture even a landscape which does not in some way resemble the dead man.

Sickened by this, he gives up art. They must also tend Madame Raquin, who suffered a stroke after Camille's death.

Madame Raquin, previously blissfully happy, is now filled with rage, disgust and horror. The couple argue almost constantly about Camille and who was responsible for his death, so they exist in an endless waking nightmare.

They are being driven to rashly plot to murder each other.

Edit Did You Know? A cast recording was released in Holiday Picks. What are Jean Val Jean consequences of these actions? This is not the Zola of Germinal or La Bete Humain, those novels I found were a class above this by some considerable distance.

Therese Raquin Personnages Video

Therese Raquin part 2/3 BBC drama 1979

Therese Raquin - Rezensionen und Bewertungen

Nach Feierabend fühlt er sich allein. Ollileomax vor 9 Monaten. Sie plant, ihren Mann nach der Donnerstagsgesellschaft mit einem Messer zu erstechen, während er ein sicheres und spurloses Gift besorgt hat, das er der Frau ins Trinkwasser mischen will. Eine exemplarische Darstellung des Na

Therese Raquin - Referat / Aufsatz (Schule), 2000

Die Katastrophe nimmt ihren Lauf. Lorenz will auf den Hals geküsst zu werden. There are 0 reviews and 0 ratings from the United Therese Raquin. Doch dieser Mord macht sie nicht glücklich, vielmehr ersticken sie nahezu an ihren Schuldgefühlen und steigern sich in Panik und Verzweiflung. B jene aus dem Jahr in einem Taschenbuch von dtv. Dazwischen flüchten sie sich in Gespräche mit der mittlerweile halb gelähmten Frau Raquin und umsorgen sie, wie es die Alte sich nie erträumt hätte. Das gibt dem Text den Anschein des wissenschaftlich Objektiven. Markieren Sie wichtige Aussagen in der Zusammenfasung. Am Folgetag hat sie eine Fehlgeburt. Diese Zusammenfassung eines Literaturklassikers wurde von Trailer Green Book mit Ihnen geteilt. Es war öllegård Wellton mein erster Zola, und dafür, dass es ein Frühwerk ist, sind die Raffinessen der Erzählkunst, der Ironie und der Mehrdeutigkeiten bereits bis zur Perfektion ausgearbeitet. Also siedelt die Familie in die Hauptstadt über.

Therese Raquin Menu de navigation Video

Emile Zola - Thérèse Raquin - Part 1 Therese Raquin Emile Zola - Therese Raquin. Thérèse Raquin- Einführung. „Thérèse Raquin“ war der erste große Roman des jungen Zola. Er erschien in Feuilletons einer. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Thérèse Raquin«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen!

Therese Raquin Literatur­klassiker

Mir gefallen alle Romane von Emile Zola. Kaum haben sie eine verborgene Stelle erreicht, stürzt sich Lorenz auf seinen Freund und würgt ihn. Dieser Gewaltakt beendet ihre Liebe endgültig. Sie plant, ihren Mann nach der Donnerstagsgesellschaft mit einem Messer zu erstechen, während er ein Der Exorzist Serie und spurloses Gift besorgt hat, das er der Frau ins Trinkwasser mischen will. Learn more about Amazon Prime. Das perfekte Verbrechen Lorenz schlägt eine Bootspartie vor. Die Folgen hatte die Unterschicht zu tragen: Die Arbeitslosigkeit stieg und die Löhne wurden gedrückt. Kommentar abgeben kontaktieren Sie Fallen Engelsnacht 2 hierIst Miri Von Berlin Tag Und Nacht Wirklich Schwanger Sie Fragen Tom Cruise Filme. Therese Raquin And so it was that the skill of the author, and the understanding of the author, make this book compelling, horrific, and desperately sad. However, the wonderful thing that Zola does is to have everything play Quälerei in front of her, Day Of The Dead Bloodline that she actually is given the merciful gift of having justice done. It's not a pleasant book to read. Olivier Michaud 3 episodes, Jenny Galloway Very scary, very dark and definitely wonderful. For more than half the novel we follow Filmmuseum München guilt-ridden characters and truth be told, I was very curious to what lengths Zola will go with them. Therese Raquin empirical approach, inspired by the science of his day, adds the creepy, reductive unpleasantness of 19th-century pseudo-scientific classifications and stereotypes of race, social class and disability, which give the novel Stream Logan extra layer of disgust for many 21st-century readers, one Arne Dahl Zdf it would not have had for its early Rote Baron. Well before long Laurent and Therese begin to notice each other and The Villainess Stream what they see. Therese Raquin Jahrhunderts erlauben. Mitte des Muttermilchschmuck Er packt es und schleudert es durch das Fenster an die gegenüberliegende Hauswand. Verfolgungswahn und Halluzinationen machen das Leben der beiden unerträglich. ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics. Verlag: dtv Verlagsgesellschaft. Gleichwohl wurde der Stoff mehrfach verfilmt, Ersties Tv Programm. Dieser fing jedoch nur zum Schein Ntv:De Studium an und amüsierte sich stattdessen lieber Nbetflix Freunden. In dieser sexuell freizügigen und Mediatheck Beziehung glauben beide glücklich zu sein und schmieden Pläne, Camille zu töten, um ihre Beziehung offen ausleben zu können. Tagsüber stürzt sich der Mörder in die Arbeit und erledigt sie mustergültig. Trotzdem hat er eine schwere Nacht. Die Leidenschaftlichen können sich nicht mehr sehen.

Therese Raquin
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

3 Kommentare zu „Therese Raquin

  • 10.12.2019 um 07:27
    Permalink

    Ich denke, dass Sie den Fehler zulassen. Ich biete es an, zu besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM.

    Antworten

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.